Best Waffle Makers of 2021: 10 Models Tested and Reviewed

What’s better than a Best Waffle Makers to make Waffle? A joke, of course! Made with such glorious cheese and eggs, a chaffle is a cheese lover’s dream. Instead of making a waffle batter that contains eggs, flour, sugar, and milk, you make a chaffle with beaten eggs, a cheese of your choice (Parmesan is definitely the best), and any seasoning of your choice. When you pour the batter into the waffle iron and let it cook, you end up with a delicious cheese waffle.

Chaffles have also become increasingly popular due to their low calorie and low carbohydrate qualities. They are great if you have a meal plan or keto diet. They are also extremely versatile! You can eat them as is, make them sweet or savory, put them in a sandwich, or even make a pizza in the chaffle! The possibilities are limitless!

Let’s take a look at the best waffle maker for sprinkles!

Finding the best was next up on our list of challenges. After several hours of testing, we decided on a few models that we think are suited.

A Comparison of our Favorite Best Waffle Maker

No products found.

How We Tested the Waffle Makers

Criteria for an ideal waffle are somewhat subjective: Some of us like our waffles crunchy on the outside but fluffy in the center, others prefer a purely crispy waffle, and still others like a blond, entirely fluffy waffle. Still, some technical standards are pretty universally accepted, and those were what we focused on during our test. A good waffle iron should heat evenly and cook batter consistently from top to bottom and side to side without burnt spots or raw patches. It should allow enough steam to escape during the cooking process to produce waffles that are structurally firm and not soggy. It should also be reliable, repeating the same results batch after batch.

There are millions of recipes for waffles, but most batters fall into two distinct categories: yeast-raised (more commonly used for thicker Belgian-style waffles) and baking powder-leavened (also called “American”; think Bisquick and the like). That said, you can use yeast-raised batter in American-style waffle makers and American-style batter in Belgian-style waffle makers (though the texture and shape will, of course, will be dependent on the waffle maker). Our lineup of contenders included both Belgian- and American-style machines. We tested all of the machines using this buttermilk waffle recipe. We also evaluated the following factors with each waffle maker.1. Does the waffle maker feel sturdy and well-built? Is it unnecessarily large or clunky?

Unless you lead a life of leisure (or run a bed and breakfast) chances are your waffle iron is not going to be a daily-use appliance, so ideally you shouldn’t have to allocate much of your kitchen real estate to store it. Since most waffle irons are pretty bulky, we paid special attention to the design—does the size of the machine make sense? Is the space well-used? Does it feel solidly built? Does it seem like it will hold up well to cleaning and other wear and tear?2. Does it heat the batter consistently? Do the waffles come out evenly cooked with crispy exteriors and tender centers?

A perfect waffle is a thing of beauty. On the other hand, a limp, floppy waffle—or a waffle with burnt patches and pale, raw spots, feels like a crime against breakfast. We paid close attention to consistency and even-waffling ability, subtracting points for poor or unreliable performance.3. Does the waffle maker have a non-stick surface and, if so, does it work?

These days, lots of waffle irons have non-stick surfaces—a convenience that can greatly reduce prep (no greasing necessary!) and simplify cleanup. We kept an eye on how well the surfaces worked and if they easily released waffles after cooking.4. Does it offer any nice extras?

Some waffle makers are equipped with nothing but an on-off light and a “ready indicator,” but even an increasing amount of budget-friendly models have extra features like numbered dials to adjust the preferred degrees of doneness, beeps or buzzers that indicate when the cook time is finished, and removable plates that can be popped into the dishwasher for easy cleaning.5. Is it easy to clean?

Batter is messy stuff, and all those nooks and crannies in a waffle iron can be tough to get clean, so any model that made the task easier—whether it be with attachments to catch wayward drips and spills or with dishwasher-safe plates—got a plus in our book.

Other Waffle Makers We Tested

There’s no easy way to say this: The real revelation of this test was just how mediocre most waffle irons are. But at least they were consistent in the ways in which they were mediocre! Far and away, the most common problem was one of uneven cooking, or what we like to call the “two-face” effect: waffles that emerged from the iron evenly browned on one side but pale and doughy on the other. It is not a good look.ADVERTISEMENT

Beyond that, we liked the very compact size (perfect for tiny apartment dwellers!) and modest price of the Hamilton Beach 2-Slice Belgian Waffle Maker. As usual, we were won over by the solid body and smartly designed drip-catching “moat” on the Breville No-Mess Waffle Maker, but at $128 we felt the imperfect performance couldn’t justify the considerable price. The Chef’s Choice Waffle Maker Pro looked very promising, with a generous size, sturdy build, and dials that allow you to adjust doneness and set waffle preference (“crisp and moist” or “uniform texture”), but the execution didn’t live up to the promises. Finally, the top-loading design of the Cuisinart Vertical Waffle Maker seemed like a cool innovation, but in practice the results were underwhelming. And no matter what the setting, the waffles from the Cuisinart Classic Round Waffle Maker were the floppiest of the bunch.

We thought the Cuisinart Double Belgian Waffle Maker was a little too fussy to operate, and it churned out waffles that paled in comparison to other high-end options. The Breville Smart Waffle Pro 4 Slice is probably as deluxe and automated as a waffle maker gets, but it was also by far the bulkiest machine we tested. Also, our taste-testers found the waffles to be a tad too shallow; the All-Clad produced waffles that were a superior texture. As for the budget picks, Chefman Anti-Overflow Belgian Waffle Maker actually overflowed quite a bit, and was flimsily constructed.

Then there’s the KRUPS 4-Slice waffle maker. It stood out as a possible contender for our budget top pick. The build certainly isn’t as solid as the All-Clad—there’s some plastic, no 18/10 stainless here—but like the All-Clad, it is generously proportioned to yield four tall, deeply grooved Belgian-style waffles per batch and, with an adjustable dial for cook control and an audible chime that signals doneness, it doesn’t skimp on extra features. It does best the All-Clad in one regard: its non-stick plates not only release cooked waffles easily, they pop out for easy cleaning and are dishwasher safe. That’s a game changer right there.

But all the features in the world can’t beat consistency, and that’s where the KRUPS 4-Slice didn’t deliver. Some batches turned out strong, but others showed signs of uneven heating or inefficient steam release. Some waffles had over-crisped spots while others were golden on the bottom but soggy and undercooked on top, as though they came from two different irons. Still, the KRUPS was a solid performer, especially given its capacity, reasonable price, and rave reviews from other testers—it was the No. 1 pick from the Wirecutter and has more than 600 five-star reviews on Amazon. We feel confident recommending it as a wallet-friendly alternative to the All-Clad, though its results are not as consistently delicious as our actual budget winner the Presto Flipside.

5 Pro Tips for Using a Waffle Maker

Whatever waffle iron you go with, there are a few things you can do to ensure your waffles come out as tasty as possible:1. Leave some lumps in your batter.

Resist the urge to over-whisk your waffle batter. You want there to be a little bit of lumpiness to the texture. If you get it too smooth, it will (surprisingly) result in a chewier end product.2. Let the waffle iron preheat.

Those indicator lights are there for a reason! Wait until the waffle iron is preheated to pour in your batter. This will ensure that the entire surface is evenly heated and ready to go. If you won’t wait, some spots on your waffle can end up undercooked.3. Grease the waffle plates if your waffle maker is not nonstick.

Just like with a pan, you’ve got to grease the surface with butter, oil, or cooking spray. If you forget this step, you’ll leave half your waffle behind when you try to pry it out of the pan. Of course, if you do have a nonstick waffle iron you should skip the grease.

4. Don’t peak at the waffle while it’s cooking.

We know it’s tempting, but do not open the lid until the indicator light says the waffle is done. If you open the lid and the waffle isn’t finished, you will literally rip the waffle apart—and there’s no coming back from that.

5. Never lift the waffle out with metal utensils.

Always use a utensil that is made out of plastic, silicone, or rubber when prying out the waffle, because metal utensils will definitely scratch your waffle maker. The best waffle makers are an investment, so you definitely want to keep them scratch-free if possible!

The waffle recipes used during testing

I tried two recipes: a Belgian waffle mix for the thicker Belgian waffle irons, and a regular buttermilk waffle recipe. See below…

At a glance | Basic Belgian waffle mix

Ideal for deeper grooved wafflers, as a base for either sweet or savoury waffles. This recipe makes about four waffles and you can easily double the quantities to make eight.

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 90g plain flour
  • ½ tbsp caster sugar
  • ½ tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 150ml full fat milk
  • 40g unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • Vegetable oil or butter to grease the waffle plates

METHOD

  1. Place the four, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl and mix well
  2. In a separate bowl, combine the milk, butter and egg. Add this to the dry ingredients and stir well until blended and smooth.
  3. Leave the batter to rest for five minutes.
  4. Lightly grease the plates and preheat the waffle maker
  5. When the green light indicates its ready, pour a ladleful (approx 90m) into each grid. Close the lid and cook for approximately 3-8 minutes, depending on your preference and waffle maker.
  6. Open the lid and check the waffles. Once cooked, carefully remove and keep warm on a wire rack in the oven until you’re ready to serve them.

At a glance | Regular buttermilk waffle recipe

SERVES

4-6, depending on the size of the waffle maker

INGREDIENTS

  • 280g plain flour
  • 60g caster sugar
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 3 eggs, separated
  • 500ml milk
  • 100g melted butter

METHOD

  1. Add the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt together and mix
  2. In a separate bowl, add the milk, egg yolks and melted butter together and mix
  3. Add the milk mixture to the dry ingredients and mix together
  4. In a food mixer or with a hand whisk, whisk the egg whites until stiff
  5. Gently fold the egg whites into the waffle mix
  6. Use a ladle to place the mix in the waffle maker
  7. Place the finished waffles on a cooling rack and tuck in.

Waffle tip: For best results, allow the waffle mixture to rest for a few minutes, to allow the chemical reaction of the baking powder to begin and ensure the batter rises.

What to look for when buying a waffle maker

Quality of non-stick: Nearly all waffle makers come with non-stick plates. The non-stick coating needs to be durable. We looked for plates that released the waffles easily after cooking with no sticking or tearing.

Indicator lights: Having one light to show that the machine is turned on and a second light to indicate the waffle maker has come up to cooking temperature is a very useful feature.

Removable plates: Though not essential, having removable plates can make cleaning easier.

Overrun channel: Some machines have a useful ‘overrun’ channel that collects excess batter and prevents it from running down the side of the machine.

Speed of cooking: We looked for machines that cooked quickly and efficiently.

Texture of waffle: We looked for waffles that were fully cooked and fluffy on the inside with a crunchy but not overcooked exterior.

Colour of waffle: We looked for even golden colour across the waffle, rejecting machines with obvious hot spots or that burnt on the outside before cooking the middle.

Thickness of waffle: Some machines with narrow hinges tend to squash waffles along their edge. We looked for waffles of uniform depth.

How to make waffles in a waffle maker

Our easy homemade waffles recipe is designed to be used in a standard electric waffle maker like the ones listed above (in fact, we put the machines through their paces using this recipe).

Use the manufacturers instructions to heat the waffle maker up to temperature, then spoon the batter into the mould, close the lid and cook for 5 minutes or following the instruction manual.

Once you’ve completed your batch, crisp up the waffles in the oven for 5 minutes and serve warm with toppings of your choice.

Leave a Comment